e7b67221c20745438596f1cfec059175
glass
pen
clip
papers
heaphones

an evidence-based patient-centered of prospective health care technology that will improve patient engagement. ar

an evidence-based patient-centered of prospective health care technology that will improve patient engagement. ar

a 4–5 page patient-centered needs assessment to demonstrate how to leverage health care technology to improve patient engagement and outcomes for a specific patient population. This could focus on a disease or a disorder based on the best available evidence that has been individualized to treat your patient’s health, economic, and cultural needs.

The bullet points below correspond to the grading criteria in the rubric. . If you are having a difficult time choosing a topic, review the Healthy People 2030 topics and try to find a topic that is interesting and relevant to you.

  • the importance of addressing patient engagement in the management of a patient’s specific health, economic, and cultural needs based on the best available evidence.
    • Why is patient engagement necessary to ensure that patients are better able to manage their specific health conditions?
    • What evidence in the current literature (published within the last fiveyears) supports the benefit of patient engagement?
  • the potential use and impact of information and communication technology tools needed to improve consumer health literacy for a specific patient population.
    • Consider what type of health care technology modalities are useful to improve consumer health literacy
    • Are there mobile applications, telehealth features, or other technology that can facilitate improving patient care?
  • the value and relevance of the technology modalities that may be used to address the needs identified in the patient population assessment.
    • How does each proposed technology modality encourage patient engagement in an ethical, culturally sensitive, and inclusive way?
    • Ensure that your strategies:
      • Promote honest communications.
      • Facilitate sharing only the information you are required and permitted to share.
      • Enable you to make complex medical terms and concepts understandable to your patient and their family regardless of language, abilities, or educational level.
    • Consider how health information exchange and interoperability of technology modalities contribute to their value.
  •  innovative strategies for leveraging technology to support quality, ethical, and efficient patient care that is culturally and linguistically appropriate for the identified patient population.
    • Consider how the selected technology impacts the patient in the most efficient way.
    • Is the selected technology culturally and linguistically appropriate?
  •  how the proposed strategies will mitigate the risk of adverse outcomes due to inequity in access to patient personal health data and technology modalities.
    • What are potential risks that could lead to adverse outcomes for certain members of the population?
    • How will those risks be mitigated?
    • How have your proposed strategies been used previously to address iniquities and risks?

NEEDS ASSESSMENT 1

Evidence-Based Patient-Centered Needs Assessment

Student’s Name

Course

Instructor

Date

NEEDS ASSESSMENT 2

Evidence-Based Patient-Centered Needs Assessment

Introduction

Evidence-based practice is crucial in contemporary healthcare to guarantee high-quality

treatment and improve patient outcomes. In order to enhance patient outcomes and engagement

for a particular patient group, this article will offer an evidence-based patient-centered needs

assessment. People with type 2 diabetes, a chronic illness needing active patient engagement in

its care, are the target patient group. In addition to discussing technology-leverage tactics and

possible concerns related to unequal access to healthcare technology, this article will examine the

value of patient participation and assess the effects of ICT tools.

Importance of Addressing Patient Engagement

Effective healthcare delivery, which acknowledges individuals as active partners in their

health management, is built on patient engagement. By including patients in decision-making,

supporting improved adherence to treatment approaches, and encouraging healthier lives, patient

engagement allows people to take charge of their health (Brand-McCarthy et al., 2020). Patient

involvement, for instance, might result in more individualized food and activity advice for the

treatment of type 2 diabetes that takes into consideration cultural preferences and financial

limitations.

Patient participation is essential because it promotes informed decision-making since

involved patients have a deeper understanding of their diseases and available treatments (Brand-

McCarthy et al., 2020). With this information, they are more equipped to collaborate with

healthcare providers to make educated decisions, which is essential for chronic illnesses like

diabetes, where self-management choices significantly impact health outcomes. Additionally,

increased treatment adherence results from patient involvement (Chen et al., 2020). Patients who

NEEDS ASSESSMENT 3

take an active role in their care are more likely to take their medicines and treatments as directed,

improving their health outcomes. Additionally, patient involvement promotes increased health

knowledge. Patients can better understand medical information, participate in shared decision-

making, and recognize possible problems when they have the knowledge and abilities to manage

their diseases efficiently (Whitehouse et al., 2020). Therefore, increased patient participation

results in better patient outcomes.

Potential Use and Impact of Information and Communication Technology Tools

The integration of diverse modalities intended to empower patients and improve their

involvement in their treatment has been made possible by advancements in healthcare

technology. Mobile apps are one of these methods; they are flexible tools that have the power to

change patient engagement completely. These applications include monitoring capabilities for

blood glucose readings, food recording, and activity tracking for people with diabetes (Healthy

People 2030, 2023). The user-friendly interfaces and adaptable features of well-known examples

like MyFitnessPal and Glucose Buddy enable patients to customize the apps to their

requirements.

Along with mobile apps, telehealth features have become a game-changing means of

promoting patient participation. They remove geographic constraints that can obstruct access to

care by enabling patients to contact healthcare professionals remotely (Noel et al., 2020).

Additionally, the messaging capabilities of telehealth encourage constant communication

between patients and physicians, ensuring that issues are resolved quickly and successfully.

Another significant development in healthcare technology is wearables. By offering

continuous health monitoring, gadgets like smartwatches and fitness trackers go beyond

conventional data-collecting techniques (Iqbal et al., 2020). Thanks to this real-time data

NEEDS ASSESSMENT 4

gathering, patients may have quick access to information about their health indicators, which can

be particularly helpful for those treating diabetes.

Finally, patient portals provide quick access to medical information through safe internet

platforms. Access to medical data, test results, and educational materials are just a few

advantages these portals provide (Benjamins et al., 2021). Patient portals are especially

important for those with long-term diseases like diabetes since they may help them manage their

conditions better and get better results by keeping them informed.

Value and Relevance of the Technology Modalities

Mobile apps, telemedicine capabilities, and patient portals are just a few examples of the

technology modalities crucial for fostering patient interaction while respecting moral standards,

cultural sensitivity, and inclusion. Ethical and culturally aware engagement ensures meaningful

patient connection with these technologies. By providing food advice and exercise regimens that

are culturally appropriate, mobile apps aid in patient involvement (Healthy People 2030, 2023).

These applications respect ethical norms by offering open data use rules and letting users manage

data sharing. Healthcare professionals may better grasp patients' comprehension levels by

communicating treatment alternatives through telehealth (Noel et al., 2020). Patient portals also

play a significant part in encouraging ethical involvement by allowing patients access to their

medical information and fostering more openness throughout their treatment journey.

Maintaining patient confidence in technology-driven healthcare depends heavily on

encouraging open communication and information exchange. Mobile apps maintain this by

providing accurate health information from reliable sources and adhering to evidence-based

recommendations. They support informed decision-making and adherence to suggested methods

by boosting patient trust in the information they receive (Brand-McCarthy et al., 2020).

NEEDS ASSESSMENT 5

Furthermore, telemedicine consultations sustain patient-provider trust by exchanging pertinent

medical information and discussing treatment choices.

Creating an extensive patient profile increases the interchange across technological

modalities' value. Patient portals are enriched with up-to-date information thanks to data

effortlessly incorporated from mobile applications, wearable technology, and telehealth

engagements. These data enable tailored treatment plans that enhance patient outcomes by

allowing healthcare professionals to make well-informed choices based on the most recent data.

Strategies for Leveraging Technology

Technology-enabled patient care for those with type 2 diabetes demands creative

approaches that consider cultural and language considerations. It is crucial to use culturally and

linguistically sensitive tactics to make sure that patient care is supported by healthcare

technology effectively. Technology tools may close the gap between healthcare

recommendations and cultural traditions by providing individualized health advice that aligns

with patients' cultural norms and dietary choices (Whitehouse et al., 2020). For instance, a

mobile app created to help people with type 2 diabetes may provide culturally appropriate

recipes for the patient. This approach supports dietary modifications that are health-conscious

and culturally appropriate while also respecting cultural customs, which promotes patient

participation.

In order to improve patient involvement, multilingual interfaces must be included in

technological solutions. Patients who speak languages other than English can obtain information

and interact successfully in a diversified healthcare environment (Bhawra et al., 2022). The

NEEDS ASSESSMENT 6

patient-centered approach may be strengthened by including language choices in mobile

applications and patient portals, enabling patients to understand and take an active role in their

treatment. To efficiently break down medical information so patients understand their diseases

and treatment plans better, the applications and portals may include simple language

explanations, visual aids, and interactive modules.

Wearable technology allows for remote monitoring, which is a huge breakthrough in

terms of technology's efficiency. With wearable technology, patients may monitor vital statistics,

including blood glucose levels and physical activity, in real-time (Iqbal et al., 2021). Healthcare

professionals may easily access this data, allowing them to see patterns and take quick action.

This preemptive strategy lowers the likelihood of issues and hospital stays, eventually improving

patient outcomes.

The technical modalities also demonstrate a dedication to cultural diversity. For instance,

culturally appropriate information, such as nutrition advice and instructional materials, should

reflect patients' cultural origins and preferences (Buchanan et al., 2020). Also important is

language accessibility. In order to recognize and accommodate linguistic variety, mobile

applications, telehealth platforms, and patient portals provide user interfaces and resources in

many languages. This accessibility ensures that patients may access critical information without

encountering language obstacles.

Mitigating Risks of Inequity in Access

When certain populations lack access to key technologies like smartphones and

dependable internet connections, the digital gap is the first possible risk that might harm the

outcomes for type 2 diabetes patients (Whitehouse et al., 2020). This digital gap may result in

uneven access to patient portals, telehealth services, and health applications. Patient involvement

NEEDS ASSESSMENT 7

and comprehension may suffer if they require assistance navigating complicated technological

interfaces, which is another concern. Their capacity to actively take part in their treatment and

make informed choices may be hampered by this danger.

However, there are several strategies to reduce these dangers for patients, such as

working with community groups that can close the digital divide by giving underprivileged

communities access to technological resources (Bhawra et al., 2022). Community centers may

provide access to technology and help utilize patient portals and health applications.

Additionally, it is essential to provide user-friendly technology interfaces with straightforward

navigation and explanations in everyday language that can accommodate patients with different

levels of health literacy.

Mitigation measures have been used in various healthcare situations to address risks and

disparities. Community collaborations, for instance, have been utilized to reduce inequities in

distant communities' access to healthcare. Partnerships with neighborhood groups and mobile

health clinics efficiently reduce care delivery gaps. Additionally, accessible technology interfaces

have been developed for various demographics using user-centered design principles (Bhawra et

al., 2022). Furthermore, telehealth outreach was carried out through phone calls To contact

susceptible communities during the COVID-19 pandemic (Dejong et al., 2020). These

conversations guarantee that despite access to technological restrictions, patients get medical

care and counseling.

Conclusion

In conclusion, this article emphasizes the significance of using healthcare technology for

enhanced patient engagement and results, particularly for people with type 2 diabetes. The

solutions described strongly emphasize moral, linguistic, and cultural factors, understanding that

NEEDS ASSESSMENT 8

effective implementation depends on patient empowerment and fair access. Healthcare providers

may influence positive improvements in patient self-management, treatment adherence, and

general well-being by encouraging patient participation using cutting-edge technology,

addressing cultural diversity, boosting health literacy, and reducing possible dangers. Technology

facilitates patient-centered care that overcomes obstacles, improves communication, and alters

healthcare experiences via these all-encompassing activities.

References

Benjamins, J., Haveman-Nies, A., Gunnink, M., Goudkuil, A., & De Vet, E. (2021). How

the use of a patient-accessible health record contributes to patient-centered care: a

scoping review. Journal of medical Internet research, 23(1), e17655.

NEEDS ASSESSMENT 9

Bhawra, J., Buchan, M. C., Green, B., Skinner, K., & Katapally, T. R. (2022). A guiding

framework for needs assessment evaluations to embed digital platforms in partnership

with Indigenous communities. PLoS One, 17(12), e0279282.

Brand-McCarthy, S. R., Delaney, R. K., Noseworthy, P. A., & STEP-UP AFIB Writing

Group. (2020). Can shared decision-making improve stroke prevention in atrial

fibrillation? implications of the updated guidelines. Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality

and Outcomes, 13(3), e006080.

Buchanan, C., Howitt, M. L., Wilson, R., Booth, R. G., Risling, T., & Bamford, M.

(2020). Nursing in the age of artificial intelligence: Protocol for a scoping review. JMIR

research protocols, 9(4), e17490.

Chen, S. C. I., Hu, R., & McAdam, R. (2020). Smart, remote, and targeted health care

facilitation through connected health: Qualitative study. Journal of medical Internet

research, 22(4), e14201.

DeJong, C., Chen, A. H., & Lo, B. (2020). An ethical framework for allocating scarce

inpatient medications for COVID-19 in the US. JAMA, 323(23), 2367-2368.

Healthy People 2030. (2023, April 27). Diabetes management: Mobile phone

applications used within healthcare systems for type 2 diabetes self-management7. The

Community Guide. https://www.thecommunityguide.org/findings/diabetes-management-

mobile-phone-applications-used-within-healthcare-systems-type-2.html

Iqbal, S. M., Mahgoub, I., Du, E., Leavitt, M. A., & Asghar, W. (2021). Advances in

healthcare wearable devices. NPJ Flexible Electronics, 5(1), 9.

NEEDS ASSESSMENT 10

Noel, K., Messina, C., Hou, W., Schoenfeld, E., & Kelly, G. (2020). Tele-transitions of

care (TTOC): a 12-month, randomized controlled trial evaluating the use of telehealth to

achieve triple aim objectives. BMC family practice, 21, 1-9.

Whitehouse, C. R., Long, J. A., Maloney, L. M., Daniels, K., Horowitz, D. A., & Bowles,

K. H. (2020). Feasibility of diabetes self-management telehealth education for older

adults during transitions in care. Research in gerontological nursing, 13(3), 138-145.

,

NEEDS ASSESSMENT 1

Evidence-Based Patient-Centered Needs Assessment

Student’s Name

Course

Instructor

Date

NEEDS ASSESSMENT 2

Evidence-Based Patient-Centered Needs Assessment

Introduction

Evidence-based practice is crucial in contemporary healthcare to guarantee high-quality

treatment and improve patient outcomes. In order to enhance patient outcomes and engagement

for a particular patient group, this article will offer an evidence-based patient-centered needs

assessment. People with type 2 diabetes, a chronic illness needing active patient engagement in

its care, are the target patient group. In addition to discussing technology-leverage tactics and

possible concerns related to unequal access to healthcare technology, this article will examine the

value of patient participation and assess the effects of ICT tools.

Importance of Addressing Patient Engagement

Effective healthcare delivery, which acknowledges individuals as active partners in their

health management, is built on patient engagement. By including patients in decision-making,

supporting improved adherence to treatment approaches, and encouraging healthier lives, patient

engagement allows people to take charge of their health (Brand-McCarthy et al., 2020). Patient

involvement, for instance, might result in more individualized food and activity advice for the

treatment of type 2 diabetes that takes into consideration cultural preferences and financial

limitations.

Patient participation is essential because it promotes informed decision-making since

involved patients have a deeper understanding of their diseases and available treatments (Brand-

McCarthy et al., 2020). With this information, they are more equipped to collaborate with

healthcare providers to make educated decisions, which is essential for chronic illnesses like

diabetes, where self-management choices significantly impact health outcomes. Additionally,

increased treatment adherence results from patient involvement (Chen et al., 2020). Patients who

NEEDS ASSESSMENT 3

take an active role in their care are more likely to take their medicines and treatments as directed,

improving their health outcomes. Additionally, patient involvement promotes increased health

knowledge. Patients can better understand medical information, participate in shared decision-

making, and recognize possible problems when they have the knowledge and abilities to manage

their diseases efficiently (Whitehouse et al., 2020). Therefore, increased patient participation

results in better patient outcomes.

Potential Use and Impact of Information and Communication Technology Tools

The integration of diverse modalities intended to empower patients and improve their

involvement in their treatment has been made possible by advancements in healthcare

technology. Mobile apps are one of these methods; they are flexible tools that have the power to

change patient engagement completely. These applications include monitoring capabilities for

blood glucose readings, food recording, and activity tracking for people with diabetes (Healthy

People 2030, 2023). The user-friendly interfaces and adaptable features of well-known examples

like MyFitnessPal and Glucose Buddy enable patients to customize the apps to their

requirements.

Along with mobile apps, telehealth features have become a game-changing means of

promoting patient participation. They remove geographic constraints that can obstruct access to

care by enabling patients to contact healthcare professionals remotely (Noel et al., 2020).

Additionally, the messaging capabilities of telehealth encourage constant communication

between patients and physicians, ensuring that issues are resolved quickly and successfully.

Another significant development in healthcare technology is wearables. By offering

continuous health monitoring, gadgets like smartwatches and fitness trackers go beyond

conventional data-collecting techniques (Iqbal et al., 2020). Thanks to this real-time data

NEEDS ASSESSMENT 4

gathering, patients may have quick access to information about their health indicators, which can

be particularly helpful for those treating diabetes.

Finally, patient portals provide quick access to medical information through safe internet

platforms. Access to medical data, test results, and educational materials are just a few

advantages these portals provide (Benjamins et al., 2021). Patient portals are especially

important for those with long-term diseases like diabetes since they may help them manage their

conditions better and get better results by keeping them informed.

Value and Relevance of the Technology Modalities

Mobile apps, telemedicine capabilities, and patient portals are just a few examples of the

technology modalities crucial for fostering patient interaction while respecting moral standards,

cultural sensitivity, and inclusion. Ethical and culturally aware engagement ensures meaningful

patient connection with these technologies. By providing food advice and exercise regimens that

are culturally appropriate, mobile apps aid in patient involvement (Healthy People 2030, 2023).

These applications respect ethical norms by offering open data use rules and letting users manage

data sharing. Healthcare professionals may better grasp patients' comprehension levels by

communicating treatment alternatives through telehealth (Noel et al., 2020). Patient portals also

play a significant part in encouraging ethical involvement by allowing patients access to their

medical information and fostering more openness throughout their treatment journey.

Maintaining patient confidence in technology-driven healthcare depends heavily on

encouraging open communication and information exchange. Mobile apps maintain this by

providing accurate health information from reliable sources and adhering to evidence-based

recommendations. They support informed decision-making and adherence to suggested methods

by boosting patient trust in the information they receive (Brand-McCarthy et al., 2020).

NEEDS ASSESSMENT 5

Furthermore, telemedicine consultations sustain patient-provider trust by exchanging pertinent

medical information and discussing treatment choices.

Creating an extensive patient profile increases the interchange across technological

modalities' value. Patient portals are enriched with up-to-date information thanks to data

effortlessly incorporated from mobile applications, wearable technology, and telehealth

engagements. These data enable tailored treatment plans that enhance patient outcomes by

allowing healthcare professionals to make well-informed choices based on the most recent data.

Strategies for Leveraging Technology

Technology-enabled patient care for those with type 2 diabetes demands creative

approaches that consider cultural and language considerations. It is crucial to use culturally and

linguistically sensitive tactics to make sure that patient care is supported by healthcare

technology effectively. Technology tools may close the gap between healthcare

recommendations and cultural traditions by providing individualized health advice that aligns

with patients' cultural norms and dietary choices (Whitehouse et al., 2020). For instance, a

mobile app created to help people with type 2 diabetes may provide culturally appropriate

recipes for the patient. This approach supports dietary modifications that are health-conscious

and culturally appropriate while also respecting cultural customs, which promotes patient

participation.

In order to improve patient involvement, multilingual interfaces must be included in

technological solutions. Patients who speak languages other than English can obtain information

and interact successfully in a diversified healthcare environment (Bhawra et al., 2022). The

NEEDS ASSESSMENT 6

patient-centered approach may be strengthened by including language choices in mobile

applications and patient portals, enabling patients to understand and take an active role in their

treatment. To efficiently break down medical information so patients understand their diseases

and treatment plans better, the applications and portals may include simple language

explanations, visual aids, and interactive modules.

Wearable technology allows for remote monitoring, which is a huge breakthrough in

terms of technology's efficiency. With wearable technology, patients may monitor vital statistics,

including blood glucose levels and physical activity, in real-time (Iqbal et al., 2021). Healthcare

professionals may easily access this data, allowing them to see patterns and take quick action.

This preemptive strategy lowers the likelihood of issues and hospital stays, eventually improving

patient outcomes.

The technical modalities also demonstrate a dedication to cultural diversity. For instance,

culturally appropriate information, such as nutrition advice and instructional materials, should

reflect patients' cultural origins and preferences (Buchanan et al., 2020). Also important is

language accessibility. In order to recognize and accommodate linguistic variety, mobile

applications, telehealth platforms, and patient portals provide user interfaces and resources in

many languages. This accessibility ensures that patients may access critical information without

encountering language obstacles.

Mitigating Risks of Inequity in Access

When certain populations lack access to key technologies like smartphones and

dependable internet connections, the digital gap is the first possible risk that might harm the

outcomes for type 2 diabetes patients (Whitehouse et al., 2020). This digital gap may result in

uneven access to patient portals, telehealth services, and health applications. Patient involvement

NEEDS ASSESSMENT 7

and comprehension may suffer if they require assistance navigating complicated technological

interfaces, which is another concern. Their capacity to actively take part in their treatment and

make informed choices may be hampered by this danger.

However, there are several strategies to reduce these dangers for patients, such as

working with community groups that can close the digital divide by giving underprivileged

communities access to technological resources (Bhawra et al., 2022). Community centers may

provide access to technology and help utilize patient portals and health applications.

Additionally, it is essential to provide user-friendly technology interfaces with straightforward

navigation and explanations in everyday language that can accommodate patients with different

levels of health literacy.

Mitigation measures have been used in various healthcare situations to address risks and

disparities. Community collaborations, for instance, have been utilized to reduce inequities in

distant communities' access to healthcare. Partnerships with neighborhood groups and mobile

health clinics efficiently reduce care delivery gaps. Additionally, accessible technology interfaces

have been developed for various demographics using user-centered design principles (Bhawra et

al., 2022). Furthermore, telehealth outreach was carried out through phone calls To contact

susceptible communities during the COVID-19 pandemic (Dejong et al., 2020). These

conversations guarantee that despite access to technological restrictions, patients get medical

care and counseling.

Conclusion

In conclusion, this article emphasizes the significance of using healthcare technology for

enhanced patient engagement and results, particularly for people with type 2 diabetes. The

solutions described strongly emphasize moral, linguistic, and cultural factors, understanding that

NEEDS ASSESSMENT 8

effective implementation depends on patient empowerment and fair access. Healthcare providers

may influence positive improvements in patient self-management, treatment adherence, and

general well-being by encouraging patient participation using cutting-edge technology,

addressing cultural diversity, boosting health literacy, and reducing possible dangers. Technology

facilitates patient-centered care that overcomes obstacles, improves communication, and alters

healthcare experiences via these all-encompassing activities.

References

Benjamins, J., Haveman-Nies, A., Gunnink, M., Goudkuil, A., & De Vet, E. (2021). How

the use of a patient-accessible health record contributes to patient-centered care: a

scoping review. Journal of medical Internet research, 23(1), e17655.

NEEDS ASSESSMENT 9

Bhawra, J., Buchan, M. C., Green, B., Skinner, K., & Katapally, T. R. (2022). A guiding

framework for needs assessment evaluations to embed digital platforms in partnership

with Indigenous communities. PLoS One, 17(12), e0279282.

Brand-McCarthy, S. R., Delaney, R. K., Noseworthy, P. A., & STEP-UP AFIB Writing

Group. (2020). Can shared decision-making improve stroke prevention in atrial

fibrillation? implications of the updated guidelines. Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality

and Outcomes, 13(3), e006080.

Buchanan, C., Howitt, M. L., Wilson, R., Booth, R. G., Risling, T., & Bamford, M.

(2020). Nursing in the age of artificial intelligence: Protocol for a scoping review. JMIR

research protocols, 9(4), e17490.

Chen, S. C. I., Hu, R., & McAdam, R. (2020). Smart, remote, and targeted health care

facilitation through connected health: Qualitative study. Journal of medical Internet

research, 22(4), e14201.

DeJong, C., Chen, A. H., & Lo, B. (2020). An ethical framework for allocating scarce

inpatient medications for COVID-19 in the US. JAMA, 323(23), 2367-2368.

Healthy People 2030. (2023, April 27). Diabetes management: Mobile phone

applications used within healthcare systems for type 2 diabetes self-management7. The

Community Guide. https://www.thecommunityguide.org/findings/diabetes-management-

mobile-phone-applications-used-within-healthcare-systems-type-2.html

Iqbal, S. M., Mahgoub, I., Du, E., Leavitt, M. A., & Asghar, W. (2021). Advances in

healthcare wearable devices. NPJ Flexible Electronics, 5(1), 9.

NEEDS ASSESSMENT 10

Noel, K., Messina, C., Hou, W., Schoenfeld, E., & Kelly, G. (2020). Tele-transitions of

care (TTOC): a 12-month, randomized controlled trial evaluating the use of telehealth to

achieve triple aim objectives. BMC family practice, 21, 1-9.

Whitehouse, C. R., Long, J. A., Maloney, L. M., Daniels, K., Horowitz, D. A., & Bowles,

K. H. (2020). Feasibility of diabetes self-management telehealth education for older

adults during transitions in care. Research in gerontological nursing, 13(3), 138-145.